AGRELL'S NUMEROLOGY SYSTEM USING THE ELDER FUTHARK


In this article I will introduce to you a theory of a secret numerology system using the Elder Futhark. This numerology system is based on a theory by the Swedish runologist Sigurd Agrell. This theory requires the ranking of the runes in a different order than what is generally shown in most recent books on runes. You will find this ranking of the runes underneath.

Agrell's numerology theory and how Odin's Galder songs is created is described in the following book:


  • Sigurd Agrell
    Lapptrummor och runmagi. Tvenne kapitel ur trolldoms vesendets historia.
    C. W. K. Gleeryps Forlag
    Lund 1934, Sweden
    (Republished by Psychick Release, Stockholm, 1991 [Facsimile of original edition])

    Before you read more about this theory, you should know that very few runologists follow Sigurd Agrell's theories today. But because I think the Odin's Galder Songs is a very beautiful poem, I have decided to let people who might be interested in this, get access to the poem.

    Agrell's theory is based on among intriguing elements too complex to describe in this medium. However, if you read verses 111 - 145
    (Loddfáfnirmál and Rúnatal) and 146 - 164 (Ljódatal) in Hávamál over and over, you will find, according to Agrell, the meaning of the runes and the meanings of the numerological values.


    f24 u1 th2 a3 r4 k5 g6 w7 Frey's Aett
    The 3rd aett
    for Divinity
    Fehu Uruz Thurisaz Ansuz Raidho Kenaz Gebo Wunjo

    h8 n9 i10 j11 eo12 p13 R14 s15 Hagall's Aett
    The 2nd aett
    for Evil
    Hagalaz Nauthiz Isa Jera Eihwaz Perthro Algiz Sowilo

    t16 b17 e18 m19 l20 ng21 o22 d23 Tyr's Aett
    The 1st aett
    for Divine Creation
    Tiwaz Berkano Ehwaz Mannaz Laguz Ingwaz Othala Dagaz


    UTHARK - AGRELL'S RUNIC NUMEROLOGY SYSTEM
    According to Agrell the Elder 24-runic Futhark contains a secret numerology system which was unknown to ordinary people, and only the "priesthood", the rune masters, were familiar with the system. It's well known that each rune has its own name, sound value, and symbolic meaning, but in this theory each rune also has its own numerological value.

    The easy way to find the right numerological value for each rune is to move the first rune of the upper row, Fehu, to the final position in the lower row. Then you start to count at what is usually the second rune in the upper row, Uruz, as 1, Thurisaz as 2, Ansuz as 3, Raidho as 4. Continue consecutively to the end of the Futhark, where you now find the moved rune, Fehu, as the 24th. According to Agrell these are the numerological values for each rune.

    THE THREE AETTIR ACCORDING TO AGRELL
    In Agrell's numerology theory the upper row, which starts with the rune Fehu, is called Frey's Aett. It's considered to be the 3rd aett and stands for "Divinity".

    The middle row which starts with the rune Hagalaz is called Hagall's Aett. It's the 2nd aett and stands for "Evil".

    The lower row which starts with the rune Tiwaz is called Tyr's Aett. It's considered to be the 1st aett and stands for "Divine Creation".


    ODIN'S GALDER SONGS

    It is time
    to sing from the seat of the wise
    of what at Urd's Well;
    I saw in silence,
    I saw and thought on,
    long I listened to men,
    about nunes I heard spoken
    and advise was given;
    at Har's hall,
    in Har's hall
    There I heard this:

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Never rise at night
    unless you need to spy
    Or to ease yourself in the outhouse.

    The first charm I know
    is unknown to rulers
    Or any of human kind;
    Help it is named,
    for help it can give
    In hours of sorrow
    and anguish

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Shun a woman,
    wise in magic,
    Her bed and her embraces:

    I know a second
    that the sons of men
    Must learn who wish to be leeches

    If she cast a spell,
    you will care no longer
    To meet and speak with men,
    Desire no food,
    desire no pleasure,
    In sorrow fall asleep.

    I know a third
    in the thick of battle,
    If my need be great enough,
    It will blunt
    the edges of enemy swords,
    Their weapons will make no wounds

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Never seduce
    anothers wife,
    Never make her your mistress.

    I know a fourth
    it will free me quickly
    if foes should bind me fast
    With strong chains,
    a chant that makes Fetters spring from the feet,
    Bonds burst from the hands.

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    If you must journey
    to mountains and firths,
    Take food and fodder with you

    I know a fifth
    no flying arrow,
    Aimed to bring harm to men,
    Flies too fast
    for my fingers to catch it
    And hold it in mid-air.

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Never open your heart
    to an evil man
    When fortune does not favour you:
    From an evil man,
    if you make him your friend,
    You will get evil for good.

    I know a sixth
    it will save me if a man
    Cut runes on a sapling's Roots
    With intent to harm;
    it turns the spell;
    The hater is harmed, not me

    I saw a warrior
    wounded fatally by the words
    of an evil woman
    Her cunning tongue
    caused his death,
    Though what she alleged was a lie

    I know a seventh
    If I see the hall
    Ablaze around my bench mates,
    Though hot the flames,
    they shall feel nothing,
    If I choose to chant the spell.

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    If you know a friend
    you can fully trust,
    Go often to his house
    Grass and brambles
    grow quickly
    Upon the untrodden track


    I know an eighth
    that all are glad of,
    Most useful to men:
    If hate fester
    in the heart of a warrior,
    It will soon calm and cure him

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    With a good man it is good to talk,
    Make him your fast friend:
    But waste no words on a witless oaf,

    I know a ninth
    when need I have
    To shelter my ship on the flood,
    The wind it calms,
    the waves it smoothes
    And puts the sea to sleep,

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Cherish those near you,
    never be the first to
    break with a friend:
    Care eats him
    who can no longer
    Open his heart to another

    I know a tenth
    if troublesome ghosts
    Ride the rafters aloft,
    I can work it
    so they wander astray,
    Unable to find their forms,
    Unable to find their homes

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    An evil man,
    if you make him your friend,
    Will give you evil for good:

    I know an eleventh
    when I lead to battle
    Old comrades in-arms,
    I have only to chant
    it behind my shield,
    And unwounded they go to war,
    Unwounded they come from war,
    Unscathed wherever they are

    A good man,
    if you make
    him your friend;
    Will praise you
    in every place.


    I know a twelfth
    If a tree bear
    A man hanged in a halter,
    I can carve and stain
    strong runes
    That will cause the corpse to speak,
    Reply to whatever I ask.

    Affection is mutual
    when men can open
    All their heart to each other:
    He whose words are always fair
    Is untrue and
    not to be trusted


    I know a thirteenth
    if I throw
    a cup Of water over a warrior,
    He shall not fall
    in the fiercest battle,
    Nor sink beneath the sword

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Bandy no speech
    with a bad man:
    Often the better is beaten
    In a word fight by the worse

    I know a fourteenth,
    that few know:
    If I tell a troop of warriors
    About the high ones, elves and gods,
    I can name them one by one.
    (Few can the nit-wit name.)

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Be not a cobbler
    nor a carver of shafts,
    Except it be for yourself:
    If a shoe fit ill
    or a shaft be crooked;
    The maker gets curses and kicks.

    I know a fifteenth,
    that first Thjodrerir
    Sang before Delling's doors,
    Giving power to gods,
    prowess to elves,
    Fore-sight to Hroptatyr Odhinn,

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    If aware that another is wicked,
    say so:
    Make no truce or treaty with foes.

    I know a sixteenth
    if I see a girl
    With whom it would please me to play,
    I can turn her thoughts,
    can touch the heart
    Of any white armed woman.

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Never share
    in the shamefully gotten,
    But allow yourself what is lawful.

    I know a seventeenth
    if I sing it,
    the young Girl
    will be slow to forsake me.
    To learn to sing them, Loddfafnir,
    Will take you a long time,
    Though helpful they are if you understand them,
    Useful if you use them,
    Needful if you need them.

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Never lift your eyes
    and look up in battle,
    Lest the heroes enchant you,
    who can change warriors
    Suddenly into hogs,

    I know an eighteenth
    that I never tell
    To maiden or wife of man,
    A secret
    I hide from all
    Except the love
    who lies in my arms,
    Or else my own sister.


    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    With a good woman,
    if you wish to enjoy
    Her words and her good will,
    Pledge her fairly
    and be faithful to it:
    Enjoy the good you are given,

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Be not over wary,
    but wary enough,
    First, of the foaming ale,
    Second, of a woman
    wed to another,
    Third, of the tricks of thieves.

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Mock not the traveler
    met On the road,
    Nor maliciously laugh at the guest:

    The sitters in the hall
    seldom know
    the kin of the new-comer:
    The best man
    is marred by faults,
    The worst is not without worth.

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Never laugh at the old
    when they offer counsel,
    Often their words are wise:
    From shriveled skin,
    from scraggy things
    That hand among the hides
    And move amid the guts,
    Clear words often come.

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Scoff not at guests
    nor to the gate chase them,
    But relieve the lonely and wretched,

    Heavy the beam
    above the door;
    Hang a horse-shoe
    On it against ill-luck,
    lest it should suddenly
    Crash and crush your guests.

    Listen to my counsel, Loddfafnir
    and learn my advise,
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it:
    Medicines exist
    against many evils:
    Earth against drunkenness,
    heather against worms
    Oak against costiveness,
    corn against sorcery,
    Spurred rye against rupture,
    runes against bales
    The moon against feuds,
    fire against sickness,
    Earth makes harmless the floods.

    Wounded I hung
    on a wind-swept gallows
    For nine long nights,
    Pierced by a spear,
    pledged to Odhinn,
    Offered, myself to myself
    The wisest know not
    from whence spring
    The roots of that ancient rood

    They gave me no bread,
    They gave me no mead,
    I looked down;
    with a loud cry
    I took up runes;
    from that tree I fell.

    Nine lays of power
    I learned from
    the famous Bolthor, Bestla' s father:
    He poured me a draught
    of precious mead,
    Mixed with magic Odrerir.

    Waxed and throve well;
    Word from word
    gave words to me,
    Deed from deed
    gave deeds to me,


    Runes you will find,
    and readable staves,
    Very strong staves,
    Very stout staves,
    Staves that Bolthor stained,
    Made by mighty powers,
    Graven by the prophetic god,

    For the gods by Odhinn,
    for the elves by Dain,
    By Dvalin, too,
    for the dwarves,
    By Asvid for the hateful giants,
    And some I carved myself:

    Know how to cut them?
    know how to read them?
    Know how to stain them?
    know how to prove them?
    Know how to evoke them?
    know how to score them?
    Know how to send them?
    know how to send them?

    Better not to ask
    than to over-pledge
    As a gift that demands a gift
    Better not to send
    than to slay too many,
    Thund, before man was made,
    scratched them,
    Who rose first,
    fell thereafter

    The Wise One has spoken words
    in the hall,
    Needful for men to know,
    Unneedful for trolls to know:
    Hail to the speaker,
    Hail to the knower,
    Joy to him who has understood,
    Delight to those who have listened.

    Hail Odhinn!








    ur



    thurs



    as





    reid





    kaun





    giof





    wynn





    hagl





    naudr





    is





    jara





    eo





    pertra





    elgr





    sol





    ty





    bjarkan





    eol


























































    Mál er at þylja
    þular stóli á
    Urðarbrunni at,
    sá ek ok þagðak,
    sá ek ok hugðak,
    hlydda ek á manna mál;
    of rúnar heyrða ek dæma,
    né um ráðum þögðu
    Háva höllu at,
    Háva höllu í,
    heyrða ek segja svá:

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð ef þú getr -:
    nótt þú rís-at
    nema á njósn séir
    eða þú leitir þér innan út staðar.

    Ljóð ek þau kann
    er kann-at þjóðans kona
    ok mannskis mögr.
    Hjalp heitir eitt,
    en þat þér hjalpa mun
    við sökum ok sorgum
    ok sútum görvöllum.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð ef þú getr -:
    fjölkunnigri konu
    skal-at-tu í faðmi sofa,
    svá at hon lyki þik liðum.

    Þat kann ek annat
    er þurfu ýta synir,
    þeir er vilja læknar lifa.

    Hon svá gerir
    at þú gáir eigi
    þings né þjóðans máls;
    mat þú vill-at
    né mannskis gaman,
    ferr þú sorgafullr að sofa.

    Það kann ek þriðja:
    ef mér verðr þörf mikil
    hafts við mína heiftmögu,
    eggjar ek deyfi
    minna andskota,
    bíta-t þeim vápn né velir.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð ef þú getr -:
    annars konu
    teygðu þér aldregi
    eyrarúnu at.

    Þat kann ek it fjórða:
    ef mér fyrðar bera
    bönd að boglimum,
    svá ek gel,
    at ek ganga má,
    sprettr mér af fótum fjöturr,
    en af höndum haft.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð ef þú getr -:
    áfjalli eða firði,
    ef þik fara tíðir,
    fásktu at virði vel.

    Þat kann ek it fimmta:
    ef ek sé af fári skotinn
    flein í folki vaða,
    fýgr-a hann svá stinnt
    at ek stöðvig-a-k,
    ef ek hann sjónum of sék.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð ef þú getr -:
    illan mann
    láttu aldregi
    óhöpp at þér vita,
    því at af illum manni
    fær þú aldregi
    gjöld ins góða hugar.

    Þat kann ek it sétta:
    ef mik særir þegn
    á vrótum hrás viðar,
    ok þann hal
    er mik heifta kveðr,
    þann eta mein heldr en mik.

    Ofarla bíta
    ek sá einum hal
    orð illrar konu;
    fláráð tunga
    varð hánum at fjörlagi
    ok þeygi um sanna sök.

    Þat kann ek it sjaunda:
    ef ek sé hávan loga
    sal um sessmögum,
    brennr-at svá breitt,
    at ek hánum bjargig-a-k;
    þann kann ek galdr at gala.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    veistu, ef þú vin átt
    þann er þú vel trúir,
    far þú at finna oft,
    því at hrísi vex
    ok hávu grasi
    vegr, er vættki treðr.

    Þat kann ek it átta,
    er öllum er
    nytsamligt at nema:
    hvars hatr vex
    með hildings sonum
    þat má ek bæta brátt.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    góðan mann
    teygðu þér at gamanrúnum
    ok nem líknargaldr, meðan þú lifir.

    Þat kann ek it níunda:
    ef mik nauðr um stendr
    at bjarga fari mínu á floti,
    vind ek kyrri
    vági á
    ok svæfik allan sæ.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    vin þínum
    ver þú aldregi
    fyrri at flaumslitum;
    sorg etr hjarta,
    ef þú segja né náir
    einhverjum allan hug.

    Þat kann ek it tíunda:
    ef ek sé túnriður
    leika lofti á,
    ek svá vinnk
    at þær villar fara
    sinna heimhama,
    sinna heimhuga.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    orðum skipta
    þú skalt aldregi
    við ósvinna apa,

    Þat kann ek it ellifta:
    ef ek skal til orrustu
    leiða langvini,
    und randir ek gel,
    en þeir með ríki fara
    heilir hildar til,
    heilir hildi frá,
    koma þeir heilir hvaðan.

    Því at af illum manni
    mundu aldregi
    góðs laun um geta,
    en góðr maðr
    mun þik gerva mega
    líknfastan at lofi.

    Þat kann ek it tolfta:
    ef ek sé á tré uppi
    váfa virgilná,
    svá ek ríst
    ok í rúnum fák
    at sá gengr gumi
    ok mælir við mik.

    Sifjum er þá blandat,
    hver er segja ræðr
    einum allan hug;
    allt er betra
    en sé brigðum at vera;
    er-a sá vinr öðrum,
    er vilt eitt segir.

    Þat kann ek it þrettánda:
    ef ek skal þegn ungan
    verpa vatni á,
    mun-at hann falla,
    þótt hann í folk komi:
    hnígr-a sá halr fyr hjörum.

    Ráðumk, þér Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    þrimr orðum senna
    skal-at-tu þér við verra mann
    oft inn betri bilar,
    þá er inn verri vegr.

    Þat kann ek it fjögurtánda:
    ef ek skal fyrða liði
    telja tíva fyrir,
    ása ok alfa
    ek kann allra skil;
    fár kann ósnotr svá.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    skósmiðr þú verir
    né skeftismiðr,
    nema þú sjálfum þér séir,
    skór er skapaðr illa
    eða skaft sé rangt,
    þá er þér böls beðit.

    Þat kann ek it fimmtánda
    er gól Þjóðrerir
    dvergr fyr Dellings durum:
    afl gól hann ásum,
    en alfum frama,
    hyggju Hroftatý.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    hvars þú böl kannt,
    kveð þú þér bölvi at
    ok gef-at þínum fjándum frið.

    Þat kann ek it sextánda:
    ef ek vil ins svinna mans
    hafa geð allt ok gaman,
    hugi ek hverfi
    hvítarmri konu
    ok sný ek hennar öllum sefa.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    illu feginn
    ver þú aldregi,
    en lát þér at góðu getit.

    Þat kann ek it sjautjánda
    at mik mun seint firrask
    it manunga man.
    Ljóða þessa
    mun þú, Loddfáfnir,
    lengi vanr vera;
    þó sé þér góð, ef þú getr,
    nýt ef þú nemr,
    þörf ef þú þiggr.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    upp líta
    skal-at-tu í orrustu,
    - gjalti glíkir
    verða gumna synir -
    síðr þitt um heilli halir.

    Þat kann ek it átjánda,
    er ek æva kennik
    mey né manns konu,
    - allt er betra
    er einn um kann;
    þat fylgir ljóða lokum, -
    nema þeiri einni
    er mik armi verr
    eða mín systir sé.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    ef þú vilt þér góða konu
    kveðja at gamanrúnum
    ok fá fögnuð af,
    fögru skaltu heita
    ok láta fast vera;
    leiðisk manngi gótt, ef getr.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    varan bið ek þik vera
    ok eigi ofvaran;
    ver þú við öl varastr
    ok við annars konu
    ok við þat it þriðja
    at þjófar né leiki.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    at háði né hlátri
    hafðu aldregi
    gest né ganganda.

    Oft vitu ógörla
    þeir er sitja inni fyrir
    hvers þeir ro kyns, er koma;
    er-at maðr svá góðr
    at galli né fylgi,
    né svá illr, at einugi dugi.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    at hárum þul
    hlæ þú aldregi,
    oft er gótt þat er gamlir kveða;
    oft ór skörpum belg
    skilin orð koma
    þeim er hangir með hám
    ok skollir með skrám
    ok váfir með vílmögum.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    gest þú né geyja
    né á grind hrekir,
    get þú váluðum vel.

    Rammt er þat tré,
    er ríða skal
    öllum at upploki.
    Baug þú gef,
    eða þat biðja mun
    þér læs hvers á liðu.

    Ráðumk þér, Loddfáfnir,
    en þú ráð nemir, -
    njóta mundu, ef þú nemr,
    þér munu góð, ef þú getr -:
    hvars þú öl drekkir,
    kjós þér jarðar megin,
    því at jörð tekr við ölðri,
    en eldr við sóttum,
    eik við abbindi,
    ax við fjölkynngi,
    höll við hýrógi,
    - heiftum skal mána kveðja, -
    beiti við bitsóttum,
    en við bölvi rúnar,
    fold skal við flóði taka.

    Veit ek, at ek hekk
    vindgameiði á
    nætr allar níu,
    geiri undaðr
    ok gefinn Óðni,
    sjalfur sjalfum mér,
    á þeim meiði
    er manngi veit
    hvers af rótum renn.

    Við hleifi mik sældu
    né við hornigi,
    nýsta ek niðr,
    nam eg upp rúnar,
    æpandi nam,
    fell ek aftr þaðan.

    Fimbulljóð níu
    nam ek af inum frægja syni
    Bölþorns, Bestlu föður,
    ok ek drykk of gat
    ins dýra mjaðar,
    ausin Óðreri.

    Þá nam ek frævask
    ok fróðr vera
    ok vaxa ok vel hafask,
    orð mér af orði
    orðs leitaði,
    verk mér af verki
    verks leitaði.

    Rúnar munt þú finna
    ok ráðna stafi,
    mjök stóra stafi,
    mjök stinna stafi,
    er fáði fimbulþulr
    ok gerðu ginnregin
    ok reist Hroftr rögna.

    Óðinn með ásum,
    en fyr alfum Dáinn,
    Dvalinn ok dvergum fyrir,
    Ásviðr jötnum fyrir,
    ek reist sjalfr sumar.

    Veistu hvé rísta skal?
    Veistu hvé ráða skal?
    Veistu hvé fáa skal?
    Veistu hvé freista skal?
    Veistu hvé biðja skal?
    Veistu hvé blóta skal?
    Veistu hvé senda skal?
    Veistu hvé sóa skal? -

    Betra er óbeðit
    en sé ofblótit,
    ey sér til gildis gjöf;
    betra er ósent
    en sé ofsóit.
    Svá Þundr um reist
    fyr þjóða rök,
    þar hann upp um reis,
    er hann aftr of kom.

    Nú eru Háva mál
    kveðin Háva höllu í,
    allþörf ýta sonum,
    óþörf jötna sonum.
    Heill sá, er kvað,
    heill sá, er kann,
    njóti sá, er nam,
    heilir, þeirs hlýddu.

    Heill Óðinn




    Direct links to the other pages:
    |.Index.| |.Norwegian.runes.| |.Swedish.runes.| |.Danish.runes.| |.Greenlandic.runes.| |.Germanic.runes.| |.Anglo-Saxon.runes.| |.Elder.Futhark.| |.Odin's.Galder.Songs.| |.Sigdrifumal.| |.Secret.runes.| |.History.of.the.runes.| |.Norwegian.runic.inscriptions.| |.Symbols.| |.Daily.life.| |.The.Thing.| |.Raids.| |.Stave.church.| |.Art.| |.Links.to.runes.| |.Download-links.|

    Norwegian Text


    Created by Arild Hauge © Denmark, Aarhus 2002
    Please do not send me any attachments by email.

    Last updated 21.10.2002